Another kind of language

esperanto flag

If somebody offered you the posibility of learning an a constructed language (like, for example, Quenya, which you will recognize if you have read The Lord of the Rings), you would probably say that it’s a waste of time, and that only a weird person would learn it. But, why do people think that artificial languages are not worth your while?

One day, just by chance, I read an article about Esperanto language. It had been created in 1887 by Polish Dr. Zamenhof, who had the idea of “building” a language which would be talked by everybody on Earth (as a first or second language) to allow understanding, and the possibility of talking with anybody all throughout the world.

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4 thoughts on “Another kind of language

  1. Andres

    I’m sorry, but I couldn’t continue this article. As I was saying, I started learning this language, which is very logical, and therefore quite easy (even more than basic English!) In fact, I only had to follow some basic and small lessons in order to acquire the necessary grammar to be able to read any Esperanto text with the only aid of a dictionary! (which can be found at some websites). For example, all nouns end with “-o” or -“oj” depending on if they are singular or plural. And the same for the adjectives: “-a” or “-aj”.
    Furthermore, every word in Esperanto comes from an existent language (most probable languages: the romance ones, or English/German), so it’s very easy to deduce the meaning of a word if you don’t know it!
    As a conclussion, I’d recommend everybody to look at this (it doesn’t take a lot of time) website: http://www.lernu.net, where you can find Esperanto courses really easily!

    Reply
  2. Andres

    I’m sorry, but I couldn’t continue this article. As I was saying, I started learning this language, which is very logical, and therefore quite easy (even more than basic English!) In fact, I only had to follow some basic and small lessons in order to acquire the necessary grammar to be able to read any Esperanto text with the only aid of a dictionary! (which can be found at some websites). For example, all nouns end with “-o” or -“oj” depending on if they are singular or plural. And the same for the adjectives: “-a” or “-aj”.
    Furthermore, every word in Esperanto comes from an existent language (most probable languages: the romance ones, or English/German), so it’s very easy to deduce the meaning of a word if you don’t know it!
    As a conclussion, I’d recommend everybody to look at this (it doesn’t take a lot of time) website: http://www.lernu.net, where you can find Esperanto courses really easily!

    Reply
  3. Andres

    I’m sorry, but I couldn’t continue this article. As I was saying, I started learning this language, which is very logical, and therefore quite easy (even more than basic English!) In fact, I only had to follow some basic and small lessons in order to acquire the necessary grammar to be able to read any Esperanto text with the only aid of a dictionary! (which can be found at some websites). For example, all nouns end with “-o” or -“oj” depending on if they are singular or plural. And the same for the adjectives: “-a” or “-aj”.
    Furthermore, every word in Esperanto comes from an existent language (most probable languages: the romance ones, or English/German), so it’s very easy to deduce the meaning of a word if you don’t know it!
    As a conclussion, I’d recommend everybody to look at this (it doesn’t take a lot of time) website: http://www.lernu.net, where you can find Esperanto courses really easily!

    Reply
  4. Andres

    I’m sorry, but I couldn’t continue this article. As I was saying, I started learning this language, which is very logical, and therefore quite easy (even more than basic English!) In fact, I only had to follow some basic and small lessons in order to acquire the necessary grammar to be able to read any Esperanto text with the only aid of a dictionary! (which can be found at some websites). For example, all nouns end with “-o” or -“oj” depending on if they are singular or plural. And the same for the adjectives: “-a” or “-aj”.
    Furthermore, every word in Esperanto comes from an existent language (most probable languages: the romance ones, or English/German), so it’s very easy to deduce the meaning of a word if you don’t know it!
    As a conclussion, I’d recommend everybody to look at this (it doesn’t take a lot of time) website: http://www.lernu.net, where you can find Esperanto courses really easily!

    Reply

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